Tag Archives: herpes

STI Awareness: “Can I Get an STD from Oral Sex?”

As tools to reduce risk for STI transmission, dental dams are not to be ignored.

As tools to reduce risk for STI transmission, dental dams are not to be ignored.

Many consider oral sex to be a safer form of sexual activity compared to vaginal or anal intercourse. For this reason, they might put less emphasis on the use of latex barriers, such as dental dams and condoms, during oral sex. Unfortunately, this idea is misguided and can lead to the transmission of preventable infections.

It is generally true that oral sex presents less of a risk for contracting sexually transmitted infections (STIs) – but this risk is not trivial, especially when people are under the impression that they don’t need to use barrier methods during oral sex. Most sexually transmitted infections can be passed along by oral sex, including chlamydia, gonorrhea, syphilis, hepatitis B, herpes (which can be transmitted back and forth from the mouth, as cold sores, to the genital region, as genital herpes), human papillomavirus (HPV), and HIV. Even pubic lice can be transferred from the genital region to eyelashes and eyebrows! Additionally, intestinal parasites are more likely to be transmitted via oral sex than through vaginal sex. A microscopic amount of fecal matter containing parasites can be infectious, and can be unknowingly ingested when present on genitals.


Seventy percent of adolescents who reported engaging in oral sex had never used a barrier to protect themselves from sexually transmitted infections during oral sex.


Some bacterial STIs, such as gonorrhea and syphilis, can do permanent damage if not treated in time. Furthermore, gonorrhea of the throat is much more difficult to treat than gonorrhea in the genital or rectal areas. And some viral STIs can’t be cured (such as herpes and HIV), while others can cause chronic infections that have been linked to cancer (such as hepatitis, which is associated with liver cancer, and HPV, which is associated with throat cancer as well as cervical cancer and anal cancer). Continue reading

STI Awareness: Herpes

herpes simplex virus

Here, individual herpes simplex virions can be seen infecting a host cell. Image obtained from the CDC’s Public Health Image Library.

Last year, in my Anatomy & Physiology class, the subject of herpes came up, which launched a few people into mini-tirades laced with judgmental language, describing it as “disgusting” and “gross.” My classmates might have been more sensitive, as statistically speaking, there were probably several people in that very room who were living with herpes. Given that most of my fellow students were pursuing careers in the health-care field, it was especially disheartening. Yet despite being relatively widespread, herpes is often stigmatized and misunderstood.

Herpes is caused by herpes simplex virus (HSV), which comes in two strains: HSV-1 and HSV-2. HSV-1 is most often associated with oral herpes, while HSV-2 is most often associated with genital herpes, though by no means is this association exclusive. For example, HSV-1 can cause genital herpes when the site of infection is the genitals. It is estimated that only 10 to 15 percent of those with herpes exhibit symptoms, and that millions of people unknowingly carry the virus. After infection, the virus enters a latent state in nerve cells, where it will remain for the rest of the host’s life – the same is true for other viruses in the Herpesviridae family, such as the virus that causes chickenpox.

Oral herpes is incredibly common – about 90 percent of U.S. adults have been infected with HSV-1, and most of them caught it as infants or children through nonsexual transmission. HSV causing oral herpes remains latent in the trigeminal nerve ganglia in the face. Cold sores, which appear on the outer margin of the lips, appear when the virus has been activated and it moves along the pathway of nerves from the ganglia to the surface of the skin. They can be triggered by sunburn, stress, or even menstruation.

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